2018 Agenda

Tuesday, May 8

Concurrent Session Tracks:

  • Leadership and Strategy
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Pedagogy and Instructional Design
  • Highlighted Sessions

7:00 – 8:30 AM

Registration Open & Continental Breakfast Provided

Atrium

8:30 – 8:45 AM

Welcome Address

Mark Askren, Vice President for Information Technology and CIO (NU ITS) 

Grand Ballroom

8:45 – 9:45 AM

Keynote Presentation. Learning How to Learn: Powerful Mental Tools to Help You Master Tough Subjects

Barbara Oakley, Ph.D., Oakland University

Grand Ballroom
Evaluate Session

Barbara Oakley didn’t begin learning remedial high school algebra until age 26. Now she’s a professor of engineering, a New York Times best-selling author, and instructor of the world’s largest massive open online course, with nearly two million registered students. How did this happen? She learned how to learn, and she now teaches others these practical insights. In this fun-filled keynote, you’ll hear true stories of remarkable transformation and discover intriguing insights from science about how you can change and grow, no matter your age or stage of life.
Using metaphor and analogy, which primes neural circuits for difficult topics, Oakley explains how to learn effectively, drawing on her extensive experience as both an engineering professor and a linguist, as well as from key research insights from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Learn about which techniques help and those that do not, how to use the brain’s different learning modes to their best effect, and about methods like recall, “chunking” and the Pomodoro technique’s approach to beating procrastination. You’ll walk away with practical learning tools based on solid research—and you’ll have fun along the way!

9:45 – 10:10 AM

Sponsor Exhibits & Refreshment Break

Atrium

10:10 – 11:00 AM

Session I

Featured Extended Presentation: Fostering Quality by Identifying & Evaluating Effective Practices through Rigorous Research
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Guest Speaker: Tanya Joosten, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM)
Evaluate Session
In redesigning digital education courses, special attention is paid to sound instructional approaches and ensuring practices foster success for all students.  In this session attendees will learn how to better provide support to faculty and staff in informing their instructional practices based on previous research and conducting rigorous research on their new innovations.  
Synchronous Online & In Person Classrooms: Challenges & Rewards Five Years Into Practice
Arbor I
Elsbeth Magilton (UNL)
Evaluate Session

Nebraska Law’s online Space, Cyber and Telecommunications Law program is a part-time online option for industry professionals and was created in 2012 to address the growing demand by experienced practitioners who want to obtain an LL.M. degree while maintaining their existing work. This presentation will discuss why we believe “in-person facetime” in online instruction is valuable, the challenges of maintaining an in-person classroom and a virtual classroom at the same time, what platforms have been successful and why and a frank conversation of the challenges we are still addressing.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to better understand the uses and limitations of several high-profile virtual classroom options.
  • You are interested in the benefits and draw-backs of managing online and on-campus students at the same time in class.
  • You are interested in learning more about how “in-person facetime” is valuable in online instruction.
  • You are interested in solutions to teaching, testing and providing student services to remote students at the post-doctoral level.
We Nudge and You Can Too: Improving Outcomes with an Emailed Nudge
Arbor II
Ben Smith (UNO)
Evaluate Session

Near the end of the semester, students who've placed little importance in your course will wonder: "what's my grade?" This realization often happens so late that no amount of effort will result in an acceptable grade. 'Grade Nudge' is a free application written by the presenter that sends the following message to each student over email: ``Hi [Name], As of now, you have a(n) [Grade] in the class. This assignment is worth [Points] points. If you get more than [X] on this assignment, your class grade will increase to a(n) [Higher Grade]. If you get less than [Y] on this assignment, your grade will drop at least one grade. Not doing the assignment will result in a(n) [Lower Grade]," where each of the above variables are filled in for the individual student. As shown in Smith et al., 2018, this message resulted in a four percentage-point increase in homework scores. Further, this activity requires no class time and can be sent out by the instructor in less than three minutes.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in the Grade Nudge’s effectiveness.
  • You wish to see step-by-step instructions on how to implement Grade Nudge in your courses.
  • You are interested in resources to address edge cases such as very large classes and when assignments replace existing grades.
Hybrid Teaching & Learning for Developmental & First Year Writing Courses: Realizing the Potential
Garrat
Amber Rogers (UNO), Annie Johnson (UNO)
Evaluate Session

This panel brings together a variety of threads related to hybrid learning to present a cohesive strategy for developing, implementing and assessing effective hybrid writing courses. The panel will elucidate effective practices in course design, provide important assessment and data-collection strategies and outline the broader, institutional framework that needs to be in place to support successful hybrid teaching and learning.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about hybrid writing courses and hybrid assignment design.
  • You would like to see successful assignments and strategies for optimizing classroom and online time for the best advantage of both hybrid spaces.
  • You are interested in the data behind hybrid learning as well as key points on how to effectively support specific student populations that struggle in the digital space.
It Takes a System to Build an Affordable Content Program
Hawthorne
Brad Severa (NU ITS - UNL), Jane Petersen (NU ITS -UNK), Kimberly Carlson (UNK), Betty Jacques (UNK), Brian Moore (UNL), Andrew Cano (UNL), Michael Jolley (UNL)
Evaluate Session

This cross-campus panel includes faculty, an instructional designer, a librarian and ITS staff discussing how to build an affordable textbook program. UNK members will share learning outcomes from the Kelly Grant project including: using OER materials in courses, converting to digital textbooks, lessons learned and helpful hints for success. A UNL faculty member will discuss his years of experience in creating and using an iBook in his course, and how it has evolved over the years in his department. This is an open panel conversation for the audience to ask questions about OER and for faculty to share their experience with teaching and using OER materials in their course.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about Open Educational Resources (OERs).
  • You are interested in learning about affordable textbook options for students and faculty.
  • You are interested in new learning resources for faculty.
  • You are interested in improving learning outcomes.
Five Generations: Preparing Multiple Generations of Learners for a Multi-Generational Workforce
Lancaster IV
Olimpia Leite-Trambly (UNK), Sharon Obasi. (UNK), Toni Hill (UNK)
Evaluate Session

For the first time ever, we have five generations working simultaneously in the workforce. Online teaching multiple generations is more challenging, especially when attempting to encompass several generations of diverse learners. Instructors must consider and include both the digital native and the digital novice or digital immigrant when designing instructional and assessment material. Additionally, instructors need to consider issues of accessibility and equity in designing instructional and assessment materials across multiple generations. This presentation will demonstrate how instructors can use the intergenerational workforce research to effectively design an intergenerational-inclusive online course.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about intergenerational workforce researchrelated to online learners.
  • You would like to review research related to online learners, digital natives and digital novices.
  • You would like to explore the development of an intergenerationally-inclusive online course.
Schedule NU! Schedule SC!
Lancaster V-VI
Cheri Polenske (NU ITS), Jean Padrnos (NU ITS), Corrie Svehla (NU ITS - UNL)
Evaluate Session

One of the goals of OneIT is to maximize the purchasing power by consolidating contracts and utilizing common systems.  UNK, UNL and UNO utilized a product called EMS for event scheduling. CSC, UNL and UNO used R25/S25 for academic scheduling. The University was able to license the EMS scheduling solution for all of the Universities and State Colleges for both academic scheduling/optimization and event scheduling in one contract. The implementation of the shared EMS system is underway and will go-live mid to late 2018.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about EMS for event scheduling.
  • You wish to hear more about the collaborative effort of implementing a system-wide event and academic scheduling tool.
  • You wish to see the tool live.
See It & Believe It (Assessing Professional Behaviors & Clinical Reasoning with Video Assignments)
Olive Branch
Grace Johnson (UNMC), Megan Frazee (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

Professional behaviors and clinical reasoning skills are developed through repetition, modeling and multiple exposures. We developed video assignments in physical therapy education that allow students to integrate didactic knowledge into clinical cases. These assignments require students to demonstrate appropriate professional behaviors, psychomotor skills and clinical reasoning required for physical therapy patient management. For all video assignments, students are required to upload their videos into Canvas, view the work of their peers and provide constructive feedback. These video assignments allow faculty to assess professional behaviors and clinical reasoning of students and facilitate student interaction between sites.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn the value of video assignments in assessing professional behaviors and clinical reasoning skills.
  • You are interested in understanding the role of video assignments in facilitating peer-to-peer interaction in distance or online education.
  • You would like to incorporate a video assignment as a form or student assessment.
Group Portfolios as a Gateway to Creativity, Collaboration & Synergy in an Environment Course
Yankee Hill I
Katherine Nashleanas (UNL)
Evaluate Session

Recent studies have suggested the world students are facing today is moving so fast that the professions and skills they are training for now might be obsolete by the time they graduate. As a result, students in the 21st century need to think more flexibly, innovatively and creatively as well as practice in collaboration, negotiation and teamwork. With an entry-level class of 49 students in a hybrid course, groups were assigned with a semester portfolio project on the general topic of sustainability. Individual groups of students collaborated around their own sustainability message with each group member creating a portion of the portfolio using a medium of their choice. As students engaged collaboratively and creatively, they also became more powerfully and emotionally engaged in the course and topic than previous traditional research papers and posters routinely provided.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about group work versus collaborative learning.
  • You wish to learn more about creating online group portfolios.
  • You would like to understand how Canvas can augment creativity.

11:10 – 12:00 PM

Session II

Featured Extended Presentation: Fostering Quality by Identifying & Evaluating Effective Practices through Rigorous Research
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Guest Speaker: Tanya Joosten, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM)
Evaluate Session
In redesigning digital education courses, special attention is paid to sound instructional approaches and ensuring practices foster success for all students.  In this session attendees will learn how to better provide support to faculty and staff in informing their instructional practices based on previous research and conducting rigorous research on their new innovations.  
Learning to Learn Online: Helping Online Students Navigate Online Learning
Arbor I
Suzanne Withem (UNO)
Evaluate Session

Students spend the first 13 years of their schooling learning how to be good students in the physical classroom, but receive little to no direct instruction in how to be successful online students. This session will introduce strategies for developing and implementing online student-readiness programs to prepare students for success in online courses. The

“Learning to Learn Online” resource developed at UNO will serve as a model for illustrating these strategies. This session invites faculty to take advantage of available resources and encourages digital learning administrators, advisers and student support service providers to develop their own school-specific resources.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in resources and strategies available to prepare students for online learning.
  • You are interested in learning about the instructional gap in preparing online learners as well as the knowledge needed to fill it.
  • You are interested in creating your own resources to better prepare students for online learning.
Beyond Closed Captioning: The Other ADA Accessibility Requirements
Arbor II
Analisa McMillan (UNMC), Peggy Moore (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

Did you know that there is more to making online courses ADA accessible than just closed captioning videos? Join us as we uncover the ADA accessibility requirements in the Section 508 refresh. In this session, we will discuss how to design online course space, materials and documents to meet compliance standards. Learn the whys and hows to formatting PDFs, PPTs, Canvas content pages, Word documents and multimedia to meet standards as well as considerations for colorblindness.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to summarize the ADA 508 refresh and how it affects online learning.
  • You would like to apply ADA compliance requirements to course space and content.
  • You wish to see course content that meets or does not meet standards.
Using Interactive Digital Wall (iWall) Technology to Promote Active Learning
Garrat
Cheryl Thompson (UNMC), Suhasini Kotcherlakota (UNMC), Patrick Rejda (UNMC), Paul Dye (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

UNMC's iWall technology bridges College of Nursing campuses across the state. The multi-taction iWall consists of from 9-12 high resolution video panels. These panels provide interactive monitor space on which to project class content and simultaneously allow instructor and student interaction with content. The iWalls across the state are connected, allowing interactions between students in different locations. Students at home or sites without iWall are able to view and participate in class activities via webinar technology. This presentation will discuss the use of iWall within the UNMC iEXCEL Visualization Hub to teach information mapping. Time will be allotted for questions and to discuss attendee proposals for use of such technology. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about iWall technology and its potential use in education. 
  • You are interested in the advantages and the disadvantages of iWall technology in a synchronous distance class.
  • You wish to propose uses for an iWall in your course. 
Cybersecurity Threats & Challenges
Hawthorne
JR Noble (NU ITS - UNL)
Evaluate Session

Cyberattacks have brought a paradigm shift in how we secure and protect information. Today, NATO ranks attacks from phishing & malware among their greatest concerns. These attacks are attractive to hackers, who find them to be cheap, hard to track and even harder to attribute. As budgets rise and fall, awareness of cyberthreats and challenges has never been more critical. Theft of intellectual property, loss of research and attacks on the reputation of the University are among the challenges managed by our team. Join the UNL Information Security team for a talk about today’s cyberthreats and how they are impacting the University.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand why your credentials are more valuable than money to hackers.
  • You are interested in learning about cyberattacks targeting research data and intellectual property.
  • You wish to learn about the security and privacy challenges created by cyberattacks directed towards the University.
  • You are interested in learning about the cyberthreats facing the University.
Digital Badges: A Focus on Skill Acquisition
Lancaster IV
Benjamin Malczyk (UNK)
Evaluate Session

Badges provide students with opportunities to learn, practice and ultimately be assessed on demonstration of a skill. Social work faculty designed two social work courses to incorporate badging exercise. The courses required students to complete badges in areas such as self-care, utilization of APA citations, uploading videos into Canvas and other skills necessary for students to succeed. As students practiced and demonstrated this skill, they left the course not just knowing about a specific content area such as self-care, but with an ability to actually practice self-care. Additionally, the social work department has considered utilizing badges to ensure student capacity around skills that are not specifically covered in any single course.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in developing badges to enhance your course.
  • You wish to learn how badges can shift the focus from content to skills.
  • You are interested in the benefits of badges to assist students in acquiring necessary skills in a given discipline and document actual mastery of a given skill.
Creating a Student Success Center Transitioning Graduate Students to an Online Community
Olive Branch
Brian Wilson (UNL) Christina Yao (UNL), Erica DeFrain (UNL), Andrew Cano (UNL)
Evaluate Session

Community building and socialization are key to success in graduate education, particularly as students are facing two new realities at the start of their academic careers: shifting identity into becoming graduate students and scholars and developing online learning competency. As a way to address these challenges, the Educational Administration Student Success Center was created in Fall 2016 to increase interactions with faculty and peers as a way to develop a community of learners. As a result, student users described the benefits of the Student Success Center as critical to their success as graduate students. The EDAD Student Success Center was recognized with the 2017 OLC Effective Practice Award. In addition, the presenters have published findings from this collaboration in the May 22, 2017, edition of the EDUCAUSE Review.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in how the department found collaborative ways to reduce graduate students’ feelings of isolation and promote a learning community to foster student success.
  • You wish to learn more about how the EDAD Student Success Center assisted online graduate students’ challenges of graduate education expectation and online learning competency.
  • You wish to learn how to foster a community of online graduate learners in your own department.
Kung Fu Canvas: How a Black-Belt Panda Helped Provide Self-Paced Training to Geographically Disparate Faculty
Lancaster V-VI
Erin King (UNO), Kristin Bradley (UNO), Rick Murch-Shafer (UNO)
Evaluate Session

The Kung Fu Canvas self-paced online workshop was born because a large number of online courses are taught by adjunct instructors, many of whom are not local, and many who are employed full-time in other capacities and not able to come to campus for training. The course is spread over six weeks and allows participants the opportunity to earn “belts” or badges that correspond to the different achievement levels in Kung Fu. Response from participants has been positive and the program has been easy to maintain. It is cost effective in terms of resources and provides faculty with a free opportunity to experience the student side of online learning.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand the importance of providing training opportunities for faculty who are unable to attend traditional, in-person sessions.
  • You wish to determine whether self-paced online training is well-suited to your faculty’s needs.
  • You wish to learn the course shell for the Kung Fu class for future use with faculty.
Male Allies: Supporting an Inclusive Environment in ITS
Yankee Hill I
Heath Tuttle (NU ITS-UNL), Wes Juranek (NU ITS)
Evaluate Session

Greater demands and limited resources mean that innovation is essential for Information Technology Systems (ITS) at the University of Nebraska. A key element of a successful and innovative organization is a culture that values and respects diversity. Diverse teams, in turn, lead to improved performance and a more effective organization (Hutchings & De Cieri, 2016). In this interactive session, presenters will discuss the role male allies have in creating an inclusive culture, discuss everyday actions that everyone can take to improve the work environment and promote the development of a male allies group within ITS and how participants can stay involved.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn why diversity and inclusivity are important for the success of ITS.
  • You are interested in gaining awareness of the types of issues that inhibit diversity and inclusiveness.
  • You wish to learn actions male allies can take to promote an inclusive working environment.
  • You are interested in learning how to stay engaged through a male allies group.

12:00 – 1:00 PM

Lunch

Grand Ballroom

1:00 – 1:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Highlight & Dessert Break

Atrium

1:30 – 2:20 PM

Session III

Featured Extended Presentation: Broaden Your Passion! Encouraging Women in STEM
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Speaker: Barbara Oakley, Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan 
Evaluate Session
Women and men develop with equal, often outstanding, abilities in math and science.  However, one of women’s advantages is that they also often have a developmental edge over men when it comes to verbal abilities.  The result?  When women hear the ubiquitous advice to “follow their passions,” they sometimes turn towards their undeniable strengths outside STEM.  Some subjects—like STEM—take longer for women and men to master.  This talk helps women recognize that it’s sometimes important to be patient with passion—don’t just follow your passions, broaden them
Students as Creative Forces to Enhance Curriculum via E-Learning
Arbor I
Betsy Becker (UNMC), Peggy Moore (UNMC), Dele Davies (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

Academic institutions are seeking to enhance student-centered teaching with active educational encounters, but development can be hampered by limited time and resources. This session focuses on the successful engagement of student-faculty teams to create interactive e-learning modules to enhance our medical school and other health science programs curricula. UNMC launched the "UNMC Student E-Learning Program" for student and faculty teams to build interactive e-learning modules. Through this program, 84 students in medical and health professions created 39 e-learning projects. In this session, learn what student e-learning developers said about their motivations and benefits from participation in this unique.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in knowing how UNMC’s student and faculty teams developed interactive e-learning curriculum.
  • You are interested in identifying the motivating factors and benefits for students to participate in curriculum development.
  • You want to better understand the value of students developing interactive modules.
Rethinking Visual Communication Curriculum: The Success of Emporium Style
Arbor II
Adam Wagler (UNL), Katie Krcmarik (UNL), Alan Eno (UNL)
Evaluate Session

The College of Journalism and Mass Communications faced challenges with budget and faculty resources causing a bottleneck for visual communications courses in the college. In the fall of 2016, a solution was implemented in the form of an emporium style teaching model where students can seek help on projects and collaborate with peers on projects. The program is the first of its kind, giving students experience with the technologies and techniques needed to be powerful and effective storytellers. Participants will take away ideas, materials and lessons around organizing, teaching and assessing a course of this nature.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about the emporium style model of UNL’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications visual communications program.
  • You wish to learn more about the planning, scope, process, challenges and strategies used to develop the courses.
  • You would like to access examples of online modules, learning materials and other documentation used this year.
  • You are interested in viewing student projects that demonstrate learning from online modules.
A Course Delivery Evolution: Moving from Lecture to Online to a Flipped Classroom.
Garrat
Kim Michael (UNMC), Tanya Custer (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

This presentation will focus on the findings of a research study designed to evaluate different modes of course delivery in a genitourinary sonography course. The purpose of the study was two-fold, first to determine if the mode of delivery (traditional, online, flipped) affects student satisfaction in a genitourinary sonography course and second to evaluate overall course outcomes. During the first three years (2010- 2012), the course was offered in a traditional, lecture style format. From 2013-2015, the course switched to a totally online format and then from 2016-2018 a flipped classroom format was utilized. Assessment of student perceptions and outcomes noted mixed results in regard to the different modes of delivery utilized.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about how three different modes of course delivery were implemented in a course.
  • You are interested in reviewing the data gathered on both student outcomes and student perceptions in regard to the use of three different modes of course delivery.
Enhancing the Quality of Online Teaching via Collaborative Course Development
Hawthorne
B. Jean Mandernach (UNK), Steve McGahan (UNK)
Evaluate Session

By utilizing a collective design model, a team of content experts (i.e., department faculty), curriculum specialists, instructional designers and instructional technologists can collaborate to develop dynamic online courses that can be taught by multiple instructors over successive terms. The key to a successful collaborative course design lies in an increased up-front investment of time and resources to ensure a well-designed course that aligns learning objectives, instructional content, activities and assessments in a manner that is uniquely suited to the pedagogical opportunities inherent in the online environment. The presentation will explore various models for collaborative online course development, discuss return on investment for collaborative course design and examine the role of collaborative course development to promote academic quality and instructional effectiveness in large or growing programs.


Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in various models for collaborative online course development.
  • You are interested in the benefits of collaborative course design.
  • You wish to explore strategies for enhancing student learning via collaborative course development.
Collaborating Across NU for Accessible Video
Lancaster V-VI
Heath Tuttle (NU ITS - UNL), Jane Petersen (NU ITS - UNK), Jaci Lindburg (NU ITS - UNO)
Evaluate Session

In the past several years, the University of Nebraska campuses have seen an increased need to meet accessibility requirements for video, particularly in online courses. In this session, members of ITS from each campus will present processes and outcomes that led to selecting ilos as the system-wide tool for video storage and captioning. With the use of ilos, NU can focus on pedagogical design and instructional support for our faculty, while the system takes care of the infrastructure and workflow needed to ensure we meet accessibility standards. This session will also outline the strategies employed to make a system-wide decision, describe the benefits for faculty and students and explain the leadership lessons learned.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand more about ilos, an accessible video platform employed across the NU system.
  • You are interested in why accessibility is important and the benefits of creating accessible course content.
  • You would like to learn more about system-wide selection and approval of a common tool.
Structuring Security for Success
Lancaster IV
Matt Morton (NU ITS - UNO), Rick Haugerud (NU ITS)
Evaluate Session

This presentation will be an overview of the approach and strategy for the reorganization of security. Presenters will review the structure, how it aligns with others in the industry and the best practices. Future plans will be reviewed as well as where the presenters see the organization growing in order to address the increased needs for security now and in the next 5 years.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You want to learn how your organizational structure aligns with higher education and industry’s best practices.
  • You are interested in the key initiatives driving security in the next year.
  • You wish to learn the lessons on how to (and how not to) implement change.
Future Directions for University of Nebraska Wireless Networking
Olive Branch
Brian Cox (NU ITS - UNK), Jay Wilmes (NU ITS - UNL)
Evaluate Session

Information Technology Services is working to take the separate wireless network environments currently found throughout the University of Nebraska and move toward a single network, providing a common and convenient network environment throughout the university.  This session will leave the audience with a general feel for where the network is headed and what it means to the University community.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more on how the University’s wireless network operates.
  • You are interested in how ITS is working to move the separate networks into a single network.
  • You are interested in knowing how the wireless network will look this fall, including how to register new devices, security and visitor access.
Using Learning Analytics in Canvas to Improve Online Learning
Yankee Hill I
Martonia Gaskill, (UNK), Phu Vu, (UNK)
Evaluate Session

This presentation will discuss the use of learning analytics in Canvas to track, predict student performance and provide timely support for success in online courses. Learning analytics has developed in three stages – the first stage was describing results, the second stage was diagnosing and the third stage is predicting what will happen in the future. The presentation will show how a group at UNK is using learning analytics, collected in Canvas courses in the instructor’s role, to track and diagnose student performance. Furthermore, it will discuss a plan to dive deeper into learning analytics with Google Analytics in the third stage of predicting student performance. Finally, it will review preliminary survey data about students’ perspectives on the issue of privacy regarding their learning behaviors in Canvas

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in understanding the goal of learning analytics and want to learn more about how you can use this feature in Canvas.
  • You’re interested in how learning analytics have developed and the three stages of development.
  • You wish to better understand how learning analytics intersect with your students’ privacy concerns and the instructor’s role to track and diagnose student performance.

2:30 – 3:20 PM

Session IV

Featured Extended Presentation: Broaden Your Passion! Encouraging Women in STEM
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Speaker: Barbara Oakley, Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan
Evaluate Session
Women and men develop with equal, often outstanding, abilities in math and science.  However, one of women’s advantages is that they also often have a developmental edge over men when it comes to verbal abilities.  The result?  When women hear the ubiquitous advice to “follow their passions,” they sometimes turn towards their undeniable strengths outside STEM.  Some subjects—like STEM—take longer for women and men to master.  This talk helps women recognize that it’s sometimes important to be patient with passion—don’t just follow your passions, broaden them
Translating Studio Courses Online
Arbor I
Claire Amy Schultz (UNK)
Evaluate Session

This presentation will highlight successes and struggles of translating a studio art class to the online format. Teacher reflections on pedagogical and instructional design will be shared along with ways to provide students with a quality studio course experience in an online format.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about delivering studio content effectively online.
  • You want to effectively incorporate VoiceThread into online studio course design.
  • You ‘re interested in how to provide effective, formative feedback to students’ in-progress work.
Hidden Treasures: Lesser Known Secrets of Canvas
Arbor II
Julie Gregg (UNMC), Melissa Diers (UNMC), Analisa McMillan (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

Join us as we explore some of the little-known Canvas secrets and tools that you can use to make user experience more manageable in the Canvas Learning Management System (LMS). In this session, we will share tools, tips and tricks that will help you take your Canvas skills to the next level. We did the research and want to share the tools and tricks we found that will help you make the most out of the Canvas dashboard, course setting, rich-text editor, grade book, calendar and more.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about the lesser known tools and features in Canvas.
  • You wish to see examples of how tools, tips and tricks can enhance and make for a more manageable user experience.
The Positive Impact of ITS Reorganization
Hawthorne
Mark Askren (NU ITS), Bret Blackman (NU ITS - UNO), Deb Schroeder (NU ITS - UNK), Brian Lancaster (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

The CIOs reflect on the positive impact of ITS reorganizations for their campuses followed by an opportunity for questions and answers.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about the merger of ITS organizations across the campuses.
  • You wish to learn about the improvements made as a result of the reorganization.
  • You wish to ask questions of the CIOs about the merger and any related questions to the presentation.
Your Learners, Their Devices & You: Incorporating BYOD Technology into Your Didactics
Lancaster IV
Tedd Welniak (UNMC)
Evaluate Session

The BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) movement in education has been touted as a means of actively and individually engaging learners with content using technology that many already own or are familiar with. In this session, we discuss our experience with BYOD education software that allow facilitators to interact with, transmit and manage content in real time on individual learners’ mobile devices and tablets in both small group and classroom settings as means of improving engagement, actively gauging understanding and allowing for guided self-exploration of evidence-based medicine concepts.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in the “BYOD” movement and how it teaches the digital learner.
  • You wish to learn about the capabilities of device-sourcing software such as Nearpod and Kahoot! for use in both moderate-sized classrooms and facilitated small group formats.
  • You are interested in the limitations and pitfalls of live, presentation-sharing technology.
Extending the Conversation about Teaching with Technology
Lancaster V-VI
Marlina Davidson (UNO), Timi Barone (UNO), Dana Richter-Egger (UNO), Ryan Schuetzler (UNO), Jaci Lindburg (UNO)
Evaluate Session

Due to UNO’s rapid increase of online courses and programs, the need to expand the conversation about teaching with technology and cultivating effective online teaching environments has never been more important. The Faculty Liaisons for Instructional Design Program, a strategy introduced in 2017, has been extremely effective. Liaisons work regularly with UNO instructional designers, instructional technologists and digital learning administrators to pilot emerging technology, provide feedback on technical transitions and messaging to faculty, represent fellow faculty’s experiences and concerns with systems and tools, lead college-specific programming initiatives and host a campus-wide teaching with technology showcase. This session will provide an overview of the liaison program and feature a panel discussion from four liaisons who will share key strategies they have employed to work across their colleges to support and engage with fellow faculty.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn about the faculty-support-faculty model employed at UNO for instructional design.
  • You are interested in learning about fellow faculty’s strategies to expand the conversation about teaching with technology.
  • You wish to strategize opportunities and barriers to support this type of faculty involvement with your department, college or campus.
Scaling up Student Assessment: Issues and Solutions
Olive Branch
Paul van Vliet (UNO)
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Online courses permit the enrollment of large numbers of students which forces instructors to address the problem of providing valid and reliable assessments of student performance on a large scale. This presentation examines two broad approaches for scaling up student assessment and feedback in higher education: automated assessment techniques and distributed assessment methods. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about the challenges of scaling up assessments in online courses.
  • You would like to become familiar with automated assessment techniques and distributed assessment techniques.
  • You are an instructional designer interested in this area of work.

3:20 – 3:30 PM

Refreshment Break

Atrium

3:30 – 4:30 PM

Closing Keynote. Navigating Change: It's a Whitewater Adventure

Marjorie J. Kostelnik, Professor and Senior Associate to the President (UNCA)

Grand Ballroom
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Some people think of higher education as a sleepy backwater, where hardly anything changes too often. But for all of us living through it right now, higher education has become a whitewater adventure! Change is happening all around us in hundreds of different ways. Today, we’ll explore the who, why, how and what of change.

Who is changing…who is promoting change…who has to live with the change
• Why are some people just better at change than others and what can you do to help your organization move forward?
• How can you manage change best … both as someone called on to change and someone who is a change leader?
• What can you do to make the change process more worthwhile and more effective no matter what your role may be?

We’ll close the day with a rousing exploration of how change happens, who can make things change for the better and what your role can be whenever the next BIG CHANGE appears. Based on research and extensive experience working with organizations deeply involved in change, Marjorie Kostelnik will provide insights, humor and a few words to the wise – all about change. Bring your paddle and your life vest as we plunge in the whitewater of change!

 

4:30 – 4:45 PM

Closing Remarks

Mary Niemiec, Associate Vice President for Digital Education & Director of University of Nebraska Online

Grand Ballroom