2019 Agenda

Tuesday, May 7

Concurrent Session Tracks:

  • Leadership and Strategy
  • Highlighted Sessions
  • Pedagogy and Instructional Design
  • Emerging Technologies

7:00 – 8:30 AM

Registration Open & Continental Breakfast Provide

Atrium

8:30 – 8:40 AM

Welcome Address: Susan Fritz, Ph.D.

 Executive Vice President and Provost, University of Nebraska

Grand Ballroom

8:40 – 8:50 AM

Opening Remarks: Mary Niemiec

Associate Vice President for Digital Education, Director of University of Nebraska Online 

Grand Ballroom

8:50 – 9:45 AM

Keynote Presentation. Shaping the Next Generation of Higher Education

Bryan Alexander, Ph.D.

Grand Ballroom

What will the university become over the next generation? During the keynote address we explore the leading forces reshaping higher education. We begin with macro social forces, including demographics, economics and culture. Next, we will survey technological developments, starting with the established ones (mobile, social, gaming) and move on to emerging trends (mixed reality, artificial intelligence). With the context set, we move into academia itself, looking into enrollment, financing and strategy changes. In conclusion, we connect multiple forces, exploring emergent educational technologies. 

9:45 – 10:10 AM

Sponsor Exhibits & Refreshment Break

Atrium

10:10 – 11:00 AM

Session I

Featured Extended Presentation: Redesigning Courses & Determining Effectiveness Through Research
Hawthorne
Featured Guest Speaker: Tanya Joosten, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), Erin Blankenship, Ph.D. (UNL), Ella Burnham (UNL), Nate Eidem, Ph.D. (UNK), Marnie Imhoff (UNMC), Linsey Donner (UNMC), Ellie Miller (UNMC)

The dialectical between practice and research is paramount. The design of online courses should be informed by research and online courses should be researched and constructively evaluated to inform future instruction of courses to improve the quality of online learning. Teams of faculty and instructional support staff across Nebraska redesigned their courses for the online environment. Additionally, they designed research in order to determine if their course was effective and to identify which components of their course worked and which needed to be improved. Others designed research to better understand their students' success in the online environment. This panel of participants will discuss their experiences and lessons learned about the process and their courses, share tips and resources on redesigning courses and conducting research and highlight obstacles that they had to overcome and advice for others. Stick around for the second half of the presentation when panelists collaborate with audience members to discuss upcoming course redesign projects.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You understand the importance of research in designing online courses.
  • You want to learn about real-world examples where this has improved online courses. 
  • You are interested in learning about the process in redesigning these courses. 
5 Ways to Utilize Canvas Data
Lancaster V-VI
Ji Guo, Ph.D. (UNL), Jessica Steffen (UNCA)

The implementation of learning management systems such as Canvas have provided universities with a critical resource for gathering and analyzing data related to these questions. These evolving data capabilities better allow for the examination of current as well as emerging topics within the fields of teaching and learning, instructional design and academic assessment amongst others. This session will consequently discuss the purpose of learning analytics and its current state at UNL through the use of five Tableau dashboards on such relevant topics as student engagement, learning outcomes, at-risk student identification and overall student performance. By utilizing these dashboards, faculty will ideally be able to utilize Canvas data for decision-making pertaining to their curriculum, course design and/or teaching methods.

Choose this presentation because:

    • You wish to understand learning analytics initiatives and capabilities developing at UNL.
    • You wish to examine course-level data models pertaining to concepts of student engagement, at risk-student factors and overall student achievement.
    • You want to establish connections between various forms of course-level data and resulting academic behavior and/or performance.
Midterm Evaluations: Making Midterm Course Corrections Using Meaningful Data
Arbor I
Ryan Caldwell (UNL), Ben Lass (UNCA), Tawnya Means, Ph.D. (UNL), David Woodman (UNL)

End-of-term course evaluations have been the staple in higher education for years, with uses ranging from supporting promotion and tenure applications, selecting teaching awards and identifying curriculum and technology areas for improvement. However, these evaluations are limited in how they can support changes in real time for students. When instructors are able to get data in the middle of the semester, they have an opportunity to make meaningful instructional course corrections while they still have the students in class. These mid-course evaluations also let students know that their voice is being heard, thus making them more willing to provide feedback in the future. This presentation will take you through a journey of the meaningful value of midterm evaluations, the online and data analysis technologies used to make them happen, the potential for revealing valuable insights and strategies for responding to identified issues.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to discover the potential value of gathering feedback from students during the term and end of the term.  
  • You are interested in engaging in discussion about the need for students to be actively involved in the feedback loop for courses.  
  • You recognize that a meta-analysis of student perceptions of teaching at the mid-point of a course can be helpful in making corrections to improve the learning experience.  
Mindful Pause Practice: The How To's and Why To's of Adding Mindfulness to Your Course
Arbor II
Tanya Custer (UNMC), Kim Michael (UNMC)

Mindfulness can be defined as the awareness that emerges through paying attention on purpose, in the moment and non-judgmentally to the unfolding of experiences moment by moment. Mindful interventions are shown to improve mental, emotional and physical well-being as well as cognition and academic performance. 25 nursing students who were exposed to a 3-5 minute mindful practice at the start of each class reported being more calm and relaxed, having better focus on the professor and class content, lowering of internal and external distractions and an increasing sense of community and connection to their classmates and instructor. In this presentation, participants will complete the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale to determine their mindful score, explore the benefits of adding a mindful intervention to a course, how to add a mindful intervention to a course and potential outcomes of this type of intervention.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in your Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) score. 
  • You are interested in how mindfulness can improve mental, emotional and physical well-being. 
  • You wish to learn mindful techniques which can be utilized within an online or face-to-face course. 
Fostering Conversations with Faculty about Quality Online Courses
Garrat
Kristin Bradley (UNCA), Erin King (UNCA)

There are certain qualities and criteria that the industry agrees go into the making and composition of courses that are well designed and easy for students to use. The key is identifying what those are and getting faculty and instructional designers to ensure that they’re incorporated. The Office of Digital Learning at the University of Nebraska Omaha has taken the OpenSUNY OSCQR Rubric and combined it with a Canvas Course Checklist to create a comprehensive Course Design Rubric. This rubric is provided to faculty who are developing new online courses or converting on-campus courses to online; as well as being used by instructional designers to review online courses at a faculty’s request. The rubric is color-coded so that faculty can see at a glance which criteria are expected to be part of every course, which required more advanced skills and those that are considered expert level. This presentation will discuss how we are using the rubric to foster conversations with faculty about best practices for online course design.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to identify ways to start having the "quality" conversations with faculty. 
  • You are interested in ideas for talking to faculty about the importance of accessibility in online courses. 
  • You wish to discuss ways that a course quality rubric can be used on your campus. 
Final Grades Integration for Efficiency
Lancaster I-II-III
William Barrera (UNCA), Marcia L. Dority Baker (UNCA), Matthew Schill (UN0), Tomm Roland (UNO)

The purpose of this project is to gain efficiencies when entering grades in both Canvas and PeopleSoft. This new integration will allow faculty to pull grades into PeopleSoft on a class by class basis. The integration will reduce the time that faculty spend entering grades in two systems. This presentation will review the Spring 2019 pilot at UNL including project success, learning outcomes and modifications for the integration to go live for the NU System beginning with the 2019-20 academic year.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to better understand the relationship between PeopleSoft and Canvas. 
  • You wish to learn how to integrate two systems for efficiencies. 
  • You wish to better understand how ITS pilots projects to improve workflow for campus stakeholders. 
Small Change, Big Impact: Bringing Active Learning to the Online Environment
Lancaster IV
Grace Troupe (UNL)

We’re all looking for ways to reach through the screen to better engage our online students. This presentation will demonstrate four methods to use in classrooms in order to bring active learning to the online environment: learning quizzes, muddiest point, Zoom labs and two-phase collaborative exams. All four methods are derived from evidence-based techniques. The methods are inexpensive and easy to incorporate into your course, yet can have a big impact on learning and online engagement.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to utilize short lectures and quizzes to break the fluency illusion and close the feedback loop. 
  • You want to learn how to close the feedback loop for both students and teachers thereby modeling optimal communication. 
  • You want to implement Zoom labs to bring real-time small group problem solving to an online class. 
  • You wish to implement the two-phase, collaborative, individual/group exams to complement interactive teaching methods and improve learning outcomes.  
Increase Online Class Size & Student Satisfaction Without Increasing Faculty Workload
Olive Branch
B. Jean Mandernach, Ph.D. (UNK), Steven McGahan (UNK)

Student demand for access to online classes often exceeds course availability or traditional class size limits. While there is considerable literature outlining strategies for increasing class size by automating learning activities via technology or utilizing teaching assistants, there is a dearth of research exploring strategies to increase online class size while retaining high levels of personalized interaction/feedback with a single instructor. The presentation overviews online course design strategies that allow an instructor to double (or triple) course size while maintaining opportunities for frequent student-instructor interaction, individualized feedback and a personalized learning experience. We will provide a comparative analysis of student learning outcomes, satisfaction and engagement from students enrolled in either a 25- or 60-person online general psychology course.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in strategies for increasing course size without increasing faculty load. 
  • You wish to hear opportunities to increase student satisfaction via choice of learning activities. 
  • You are interested in tips for creating an interactive, personalized learning experience that doesn't overwhelm instructional time. 
Email Deception & Trickery
Yankee Hill I
Cheryl O'Dell (UNCA), Nick Glade (UNCA), JR Noble (UNCA)

Phishing continues to be a top cyberattack experienced by our institution. According to the annual Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report, phishing has contributed to numerous data compromises globally since 2008. There has been and continues to be a tremendous effort to slow down phishing attacks, but ultimately, the way to fight phishing is for an effort to be made by every employee that uses email. Come hear about why phishing continues to be a successful threat vector, common phishing schemes (some more successful than others), ways to recognize a phish email, ways that the security and email support staff are fighting phishing and what to do if you suspect you have received a phish email.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You want to learn how to spot email trickery on your mobile device or computer. 
  • You want to know the NEW way to report suspicious emails. 
  • You want to offer ideas on or learn how the email security solutions are deployed at each campus. 

11:10 – 12:00 PM

Session II

Featured Extended Presentation: Redesigning Courses & Determining Effectiveness Through Research
Hawthorne
Featured Guest Speaker: Tanya Joosten, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM), Erin Blankenship, Ph.D. (UNL), Ella Burnham (UNL), Nate Eidem, Ph.D. (UNK), Marnie Imhoff (UNMC), Linsey Donner (UNMC), Ellie Miller (UNMC)
The second half of this extended session will build off of the information gathered in the first half of the session. During this session, audience members will break into small group discussions with members of the panel to discuss the re/designs of their course and research while comparing notes with the efforts undertaken by the panelists. 
Jupyter Notebooks: An On Ramp for Advanced Computing & Data Science Resources
Arbor I
Carrie Brown (UNL), David Swanson, Ph.D. (UNL)

Jupyter Notebooks are interactive documents that interweave live programming code with rich text elements making them ideal for educational and presentational applications. The inclusion of formatted text, equations, figures and links along with editable portions of code called “cells” allow the use of these notebooks for self-directed tutorials and demos. Course notes may be interweaved with dynamically computed coding exercises to lead students through pre-arranged demos and eventually to enable the learner to explore beyond the original exercises within the same course templates. Notebooks can be used as presentation slides, exported as static HTML or distributed in their native format so students can modify and create code independently or through directed exercises. The Holland Computing Center hosts easily accessible Jupyter Notebooks that will be presented and demoed during this presentation. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in learning more about using Jupyter Notebooks to improve online education.
  • You are interested in data analytics and high-performance computing. 
Using Backward Design & Authentic Learning to Build Curricula from Competencies
Arbor II
Christine M. Arcari, Ph.D. (UNMC), Analisa McMillan (UNMC)

UNMC College of Public Health was faced with big changes in accreditation criteria and found the need to move from faculty-centered teaching and discipline-based content towards student-centered learning and outcome-based curriculum that was integrated and built around competencies. UNMC began by mapping competencies to courses, but a big question kept resurfacing was “how do we assess the competencies we're mapping?” Learn how UNMC used backward design to create new courses and existing courses through authentic assessments to meet the new competencies.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn about the Backward Design Process and how it relates to course design.  
  • You wish to learn how to gain faculty buy-in to this new format. 
  • You are interested in seeing examples of authentic learning assessments. 
Creating, Building & Nurturing an Online Program: A Success Story
Garrat
Melissa Cast-Brede, Ph.D. (UNO), Jaci Lindburg, Ph.D. (UNCA), Erica Rose (UNO), Alex Zatizabal-Boryca (UNCA) 

This presentation will present a case study of UNO Library Science program’s migration to a fully online format. Shared information will include a step by step review of the creative process, the curriculum conversion process, outreach and retention strategies and plans for sustained growth. Discussions will cover collaborations with key partners, marketing plans, faculty structure, technology tools and a few words about attitude. In addition to meaningful dialogue, we will share resources (templates, data charts and presentations) in the hopes that others might be inspired about the potential and power of online learning. Presenters will answer any and all questions about why we made the leap to a fully online program, what steps we took to make it happen and how we balance growth and quality instruction.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand the planning process for designing a fully online program.  
  • You are interested in learning how intentional lead nurturing can affect retention. 
  • You are interested in the tools and procedures used in designing and implementing online curriculum. 
CIO Panel - Campus Updates
Lancaster I-II-III
Mark Askren (UNCA), Bret Blackman (UNCA), Brian Lancaster (UNMC), Deborah Schroeder (UNCA) 

The CIOs will provide updates on ITS projects, campus issues and ITS successes. Bring your questions for Q&A time. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to hear updates on key ITS projects. 
  • You are interested in updates on campus issues. 
Educating with Technology Across Intergenerational & Intercultural Groups
Lancaster V-VI
Ogbonnaya Akpa, Ph.D. (UNL), Toni Hill, Ph.D. (UNK), Olimpia Leite-Trambly (UNK), Sharon Obasi, Ph.D. (UNK) 

According to Pew Research Center, there is a clear distinction between technology use and adaption across generations and racial and ethnic groups. The Pew research shows younger, white individuals possess and adopt technology more rapidly than older, non-white individuals. In contrast, there is limited research on the interplay between generational and cultural differences of university and college students and their learning with technology. Many modern educational strategies including interactive videos, game-based learning and multi-device learning address the ecosystems of resources used in combination with the methods of delivery, and the learning outcomes with less consideration given to the learner's background including generational age and cultural perspective. This presentation will look at both intergenerational and intercultural use of technology in educational settings and identify some promising strategies to reach and teach across diversity.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to explore intergenerational differences in use and adaption of technology. 
  • You wish to explore cultural differences in the use and adaptation of technology. 
  • You are interested in acquiring new strategies to reach and teach diverse students. 
Research Compliance in the Cloud
Olive Branch
Bryan Fitzgerald (UNCA), Bryan Kinnan (UNCA)

ITAR, CUI, NIS 800-171, and NIST 800-53 are all standards that the University of Nebraska was looking to become compliant within the summer of 2016. After speaking with partners at Microsoft about the University’s goals, needs and objectives, it turns out that such a space does exist in Microsoft’s governmental o365 space. The goal with this presentation is to quickly highlight the goals, needs, objectives that were defined as part of this project with a look back at the timeline, costs and the pros and cons of going in this direction from the University perspective. The session will conclude with an open discussion with the audience about policies, procedure and next steps, including the roadmap and areas of improvement.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand the steps necessary to obtain a GCC High environment license. 
  • You are interested in the compliance needs that are met through this cloud option. 
  • You wish to know the difference between the educational option and the compliance option. 
Academic Integrity in Higher Education
Yankee Hill I
Tareq Daher, Ph.D. (UNL), Tawnya Means, Ph.D. (UNL)

Did you know that a 2017 survey from Kessler International has found that 86% of students report that they have cheated in school and 97% of those students report that they have never been caught? Given these shockingly high statistics, what are you doing to deter cheating in your classes? This session will present what you need to know about academic integrity in higher education. We will discuss why and how students cheat in higher educational settings, strategies to manage student expectations and perceptions to encourage them to uphold the highest standards of academic integrity, discuss how to deter cheating and provide communication practices that you can easily implement in your classes. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn why and how students cheat. 
  • You wish to increase your awareness of deterrence methods and tools. 
  • You want to discuss communication messages to encourage student integrity. 

12:00 – 1:00 PM

Lunch

Grand Ballroom

1:00 – 1:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Highlight & Dessert Break

Atrium

1:30 – 2:20 PM

Session III

Featured Extended Presentation: Emerging Technology Trends: Virtual Reality & Artificial Intelligence
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Speaker: Bryan Alexander, Ph.D. 

This session will focus on the two major technological forces likely to impact online education in this extended session. We will explore the possibilities of virtual reality (VR), examining its current pedagogical aspects and institutional support structures. We will also examine upcoming virtual reality uses, including social VR as well as VR as an alternative to videoconferencing. Secondly, we will address artificial intelligence (AI) by reflecting on its current and emerging uses in higher education, from chatbots to AI-powered teaching software and student data analytics. We will continue on a prospective note, looking at trendlines and the history of technology to anticipate medium-term uses of AI in academia. Our conclusion steps back to consider how online education could change as AI starts transforming the labor market and society as a whole.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in the impact of VR and AI on higher education.  
  • You want to understand the pedagogical aspects of VR. 
  • You are interested in learning how AI-powered technology can impact the student experience. 
Featured Extended Presentation: Plugging into Student Support Services for Student Success
Lancaster V-VI
Victoria Brown, Ph.D. (Florida Atlantic)

    More students are pursuing their academic career 100% online. As institutions continue to develop strategies in how to create a successful online experience, students still report feelings of isolation. These feelings persist even as faculty and instructional designers include community-building activities and use instructional strategies to engage students with the instructor and each other. Could the missing component be the services beyond the classroom? Attend this session to gather ideas on how to promote engagement through support services in your department or unit.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You want to gather ideas on how to promote engagement through student services in your department or unit.
  • You wish to learn about the OLC Quality Scorecard for Online Student Support
Adapting to the Changing Needs of Students: A Collaborative Approach to Programmatic Change
Arbor I
Amber Alexander (UNK), Doug Biggs, Ph.D. (UNK), Steve McGahan (UNK) 

Establishing a quality online program takes years, but the changing face of student populations requires that these programs adapt the structure and curriculum to reflect change over time. As student population and discipline requirements change, programs must change as well to ensure that graduates leave the program with the discipline, knowledge and secondary skills that will facilitate success in their careers. This presentation will look at the challenges and strategies that have been used by the UNK M.A. in History program to continue to serve the student population. Facets of program pedagogy, faculty buy-in, coordination of student progress, an introduction of new faculty and instructional design will be addressed as presenters share their insights into the process of adapting an already established program to the changing needs of the student population.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn how to develop a collaborative team to address changing programmatic needs. 
  • You wish to assess the current and future needs of an established program in a changing field. 
  • You wish to adapt student learning and skills while maintaining course and program integrity. 
Cybersecurity Escape Room Challenge - Version 2 
Arbor II
Cheryl O'Dell (UNCA)

Do you have what it takes to solve the puzzles and find all the information to "escape" the presentation in 45 minutes? Don't worry - you will have help, and we will be asked to leave the room for the next presentation anyway! Come participate in this unique experience and learn some security awareness at the same time. This wildly successful effort is a presentation to build teamwork skills, utilize everyone's unique talents and have some fun in the process of learning about cybersecurity. In the fall of 2018, we thwarted Dale Isa Spy's attempt of stealing university data. In the spring of 2019, a new scenario and new puzzles await those who dare to try the Cybersecurity Escape Room Challenge.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn about security surrounding two-factor authentication, WiFi and using only secure websites. 
  • You want to have fun working as a team to solve a puzzle!
Online Course Design 101
Garrat
Jena Asgarpoor, Ph.D. (UNL)

Anchored by 24 years of online course development and delivery, the author draws upon that experience as well as Backward Design and design strategies promoted by Quality Matters Organization to highlight critical issues in development of an online class. Audience in this session will learn about design considerations that make an online course a positive, engaging and successful learning experience for the learners. Choosing and developing the appropriate resources, assignments, discussion activity and projects is covered, and the importance of promoting connectedness and sense of community through three types of interactions (learner-to-learner, learner-to-content and learner-to-faculty) is emphasized. Using Backward Design, the point will be made that choosing the right resources and activities is critical in the development stage within any delivery format and online is no exception. Examples will be provided in the context of a fully online, 8-week Canvas course in Engineering Leadership, which is an elective in the Master of Engineering Management program in the College of Engineering.

 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about strategies to improve your syllabus, course navigation, content/activities and interactions/engagements. 
  • You wish to learn more about Backward Design and how it can be utilized in a fully online course. 
  • You are interested in choosing the correct resources and activities in order to better the delivery format of your course. 
Feedback is a Gift
Hawthorne
Marcia Dority Baker (UNCA), Casey Nugent (UNCA) 

In August 2017, the AT (Academic Technology) Advisory Committee was created. This group was initiated as an opportunity for faculty input on academic technologies for teaching and learning at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The advisory committee provides feedback on policy considerations and strategic initiatives. Advisory committee members include faculty from each college who meet with the AT staff twice a semester. There is currently one subgroup assisting with data analytics and learning outcomes via the data from Canvas (LMS at the University of Nebraska). The AT Advisory Committee has been beneficial to Academic Technologies for assistance in policy for the Digital Learning Commons (DLC), feedback on the learning analytics dashboards for faculty and input on services such as Student Response Systems (SRS). This presentation will discuss the process for starting the AT Advisory Committee and projects and/or initiatives the committee is working on.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to better understand the relationship between faculty and academic technologies. 
  • You wish to understand several initiatives currently underway that allow instructors to fully utilize available technology within the classroom. 
  • You are interested in learning how to access Canvas Analytics and other data tools. 
Student-Centered Blended Learning: The HyFlex Approach to Blended Learning
Lancaster IV
Benjamin R. Malczyk, Ph.D. (UNK), Dawn Mollenkopf, Ph.D. (UNK)

While blended learning provides some flexibility to students, the implementation of blending learning is generally faculty or instruction driven. The HyFlex blended learning model is an alternative approach to blended learning that places power in students’ hands. This presentation will outline several approaches utilized to provide more flexible approaches to learning for students. HyFlex blended learning is one such approach. The HyFlex blended approach allows each individual student to decide their modality of instruction (face-to-face, synchronous online video-conference or asynchronous coursework) on a week-to-week basis. This allows students to make decisions based on their needs and context for each class period. The presentation will summarize student choices and preferences regarding the modality of instruction as well as the key benefits and challenges of a student-centered approach to blended instruction. Students participating in a HyFlex blended learning experiment were able to attend in-class or online in a way that matched their needs for each given week.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in the movement in higher education toward student-centered approaches to instruction. 
  • You wish to explore various approaches to blended instruction and define HyFlex blended learning. 
  • You are interested in the benefits and challenges of utilizing student-centered approaches to blended learning, including the HyFlex blended learning tool. 
Enhanced Online Student Engagement & Learning through 'Video Theater'
Olive Branch
David Harwood, Ph.D. (UNL) 

Learn about an online instructional approach to increase student engagement and promote asynchronous teamwork, which allows for self-exploration on topics of interest while facilitating passive but motivated exposure to content. The ‘Video Theater’ program incorporates student-self short videos that allow students to propose, review, nominate and vote for top-videos across a range of themes in an online course. Students work individually, in teams and within the full class to identify and filter through a range of content-rich videos from YouTube, National Geographic, NASA, History Channel, etc. These top videos are brought to the front and share with online classmates. This program affords students the flexibility to follow their interests, share visually rich information with peers and explore new content passively and effortlessly into their personal learning sphere and that of their team members. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about an effective approach to foster student engagement through video. 
  • You wish to learn about the effective selection of video themes that would focus student searches within the course content structure. 
  • You are interested in adapting course content slightly in order to introduce related content and provide new video content to be incorporated into future online delivery. 
  • You are interested in how students, working individually and in teams, progressively advance top videos for full-class viewing and commentary. 
Taking Public Speaking Classrooms Up a Notch with Digital Video Recording
Yankee Hill I
Rick Murch-Shafer (UNO)

Technology in the classroom can greatly enhance instruction for most disciplines.  But as technology gets outdated, how do you manage the equipment and end users to maintain or improve upon a tried and true classroom environment?  UNO is currently replacing aging technology in Public Speaking classrooms with modern digital video recording technologies. Come and learn about the design and approach UNO is using to maintain a consistent process and usher in new, more sustainable technologies to take it into the future. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn more about classroom video capture technologies. 
  • You are interested in the lesser known features of VidGrid. 
  • You wish to learn about how to deal with fear of change within the context of updated/new technology. 

2:30 – 3:20 PM

Session IV

Featured Extended Presentation: Emerging Technology Trends: Virtual Reality and Artificial Intelligence
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Speaker: Bryan Alexander

This session will focus on the two major technological forces likely to impact online education in this extended session. We will explore the possibilities of virtual reality (VR), examining its current pedagogical aspects and institutional support structures. We will also examine upcoming virtual reality uses, including social VR as well as VR as an alternative to videoconferencing. Secondly, we will address artificial intelligence (AI) by reflecting on its current and emerging uses in higher education, from chatbots to AI-powered teaching software and student data analytics. We will continue on a prospective note, looking at trendlines and the history of technology to anticipate medium-term uses of AI in academia. Our conclusion steps back to consider how online education could change as AI starts transforming the labor market and society as a whole.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You are interested in the impact of VR and AI on higher education.  
  • You want to understand the pedagogical aspects of VR. 
  • You are interested in learning how AI-powered technology can impact the student experience. 
Featured Extended Presentation: Plugging into Student Support Services for Student Success
Lancaster V-VI
Victoria Brown, Ph.D. (Florida Atlantic University)

    More students are pursuing their academic career 100% online. As institutions continue to develop strategies in how to create a successful online experience, students still report feelings of isolation. These feelings persist even as faculty and instructional designers include community-building activities and use instructional strategies to engage students with the instructor and each other. Could the missing component be the services beyond the classroom? Attend this session to gather ideas on how to promote engagement through support services in your department or unit.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You want to gather ideas on how to promote engagement through student services in your department or unit.
  • You wish to learn about the OLC Quality Scorecard for Online Student Support
Online Program Lead Nurturing Panel
Lancaster IV
Bob Mathiasen, Ph.D. (UNL), Stacey Schwartz (UNK), Angie Tucker (UNMC), Alex Zatizabal Boryca (UNCA)

In 2018, an Online Program Lead Nurturing Specialist was hired for each campus. The focus of these positions is to engage in proactive outreach to prospective online students with the goal of helping them through the application and enrollment process so more students enroll in online programs at NU.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn about how the Lead Nurturing Specialist positions.
  • You are interested in learning about the impact these positions made to student enrollment.
  • You want to understand how these positions complement their admission and departmental recruitment efforts.
Plan, Enroll, Progress: Integrated Planning & Advising for Student Success
Arbor I
Steve Booton (UNL), Bill Watts (UNL)

The lack of proactive academic planning tools and supporting integration between systems will not facilitate our goal of significantly increasing our retention and graduation rates. Students need to see their whole academic plan, know when they are off-track and develop ownership of their own curricular experience. In support of this idea, faculty and staff plan capacity for course demand, track student academic progress and provide real-time student intervention. To achieve these objectives, a variety of tools are being developed, purchased and integrated through a single portal that empowers students to take responsibility for their choices while encouraging departments to use newly available data to meet planned student demand. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to empower students by allowing access to their whole academic plan. 
    You are interested in data that helps students become more proactive about their planning. 
  • You are interested in new tools and systems incorporated in a student planning system.
360 Degrees of Geography
Arbor II
Nate Eidem, Ph.D. (UNK), Steve McGahan (UNK) 

Photography has been a standard aspect of physical geography, but as technology advances, it presents opportunities to increase learning in online, blended and face-to-face courses by incorporating more interactive visual imagery and video. These media can be invaluable in allowing students to see different facets of the physical world. Incorporating a virtual field trip component in an online course can be challenging, but methods of bringing students to new locations virtually are within the reach of faculty. The presenters will discuss the collection and use of 360 degree video and other forms of imagery to develop virtual field assessments for modules in an online physical geography course. The use of 360 degree cameras, drones and standard photography will be discussed, as well as how to find these types of assets without having to directly collect them.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to learn about how the barriers to the integration and use of 360 degree video, imagery and other visual elements are shrinking. 
  • You are interested in how the use of 360 degree video, imagery and other visual elements will become expected by the upcoming student population. 
  • You are interested in how the integration of 360 degree video and imagery can give students a more engaging experience. 
Using Zoom to Reach a National Audience
Garrat
Saundra Wever Frerichs, Ph.D. (UNL)

Outreach is important to many departments, but it is the focus and mission of Nebraska Extension. This focus on reaching audiences outside the University community shapes how we use technology and now others have the opportunity to learn from our experiences. Online outreach provides opportunities to attract highly engaged students to an academic program, to share research and broaden its impact and to provide value and service to all Nebraskans. This session will help participants broaden the audience for their work and increase their impact. 

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to identify potential audiences to reach via technology. 
  • You are interested in effective practices that align with your goals for outreach and extension. 
  • You wish to learn about strategies that can be implemented right away. 
Level Up Your Canvas Designs: HTML and Content-Management Hacks
Hawthorne
Steven Cain (UNL), Tom Gibbons (UNL), Michael Jolley (UNL)

While Learning Management Systems are great, sometimes we hit roadblocks when trying to create new or innovative design within the standard content-creation frameworks. Come learn about strategies to create interactive self-check questions in Canvas Pages using HTML, how to update content across multiple courses at once by using Canvas as a content host and other strategies to get results and information from Canvas without needing to resort to expensive external tools.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to deploy and update content across multiple courses without needing to host outside of Canvas. 
    You want to implement self-check questions in Canvas pages using HTML. 
  • You wish to leverage other free tools and strategies to create engaging content within the Canvas framework. 
Transitioning to the Hybrid Model: Preparation to Ensure High-Quality Distance Education
Olive Branch
Melissa Cast-Brede, Ph.D. (UNO), Sarah K. Edwards, Ph.D. (UNO), Erica Rose (UNO)

The Teacher Education Department at the University of Nebraska at Omaha implemented a two-year process of thoughtful discussion for intentional decision-making focused on faculty voice and ownership. This intentional approach allowed all faculty to develop hybrid graduate programs that maintained quality instruction and prioritized students. Through the identification of early adopters and the effective use of departmental and campus resources, a series of professional development opportunities were developed to assist faculty in course design and introduce instructional tools that aid content distribution and student engagement. Follow up initiatives surrounding the integration of educational technology and additional student engagement professional development worked to ensure sustainable practices in the delivery of quality instruction. This presentation will review the decision processes and benchmarks, professional development approach, and campus partner supports that led to a successful transition, as well as discuss the next steps in maintaining the momentum.

Choose this presentation because:

  • You wish to understand processes for fostering ownership in blended learning. 
  • You want to learn how to manage resources for effective professional development. 
  • You realize the importance of developing strategies for maintaining the momentum for growing distance programs. 

3:20 – 3:30 PM

Refreshment Break

Atrium

3:30 – 4:30 PM

Ask the Pros: An Interactive Discussion with a Futurist & a Humanist

Bryan Alexander, Ph.D. & Tanya Joosten, Ph.D. 

Grand Ballroom

You won’t want to miss this lively discussion with two of online and higher education’s leading thinkers. Gain insights into their takeaways from the day, along with up-to-the-minute trends and breaking news. We’ll be watching the Symposium Twitter feed throughout the day where attendees can submit questions for the panel. Follow @NebraskaOnline and tweet using #NUSymp19.

4:30 – 4:45 PM

Closing Remarks: Mark Askren

Vice Chancellor for IT and CIO, University of Nebraska

Grand Ballroom