2017 Agenda

Tuesday May 9

Concurrent Session Tracks:

  • Highlighted Sessions
  • Emerging Technologies
  • Leadership/Strategy
  • Pedagogy/Instructional Design

7:00 – 8:30 AM

Registration Open and Continental Breakfast Provided

Atrium

8:30 – 8:45 AM

Welcome

Susan M. Fritz, Executive VP and Provost, University of Nebraska

Grand Ballroom

8:45 – 9:45 AM

Keynote: Thinking and Working Collaboratively in Higher Education

Norman Vaughan, PhD, Mount Royal University

Grand Ballroom
Online and blended learning courses have become increasingly sophisticated and complex.  Thus, collaborative partnerships need to be established so that faculty can effectively and efficiently teach in such environments.  As Herb Simon, the Nobel Prize Laureate from Carnegie Mellon University stated in 1975, “Improvement in higher education will require converting teaching from a “solo sport” to a “community-based research activity.”  The focus of this plenary session will be on identifying and developing collaborative strategies for supporting online and blended courses in higher education.

9:45 – 10:10 AM

Sponsor Exhibits and Refreshment Break

Atrium

10:10 – 11:00 AM

Session I

Featured Extended Session: Creating & Diffusing Online Instruction & Institutional Practices From Data & Evidence
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Guest Presenter: Tanya Joosten
The session is formatted as round table brainstorming discussions that takes findings from a cross-institutional study (10+ institutions) on digital education and challenges the participants on determining how to interpret these findings, turn them into practice, and develop diffusion processes across the institution. We often hear people discuss data-driven decisions or evidence-based practices, yet many times the data and evidence that is driving our decisions and our practices within our educational institutions lacks the rigor of empirical research. The DETA Research Center spent two years designing research models and conducting rigorous research in higher ed across a dozen institutions (2-year and 4-year) to help us identify effective instructional and institutional practices in blended and online courses and programs. The research models including guides to research, survey instrumentation packet, data codebooks, shared definitions, and operationalizations of variables were shared in the DETA Research Toolkit. The data from student surveys and institutionally warehoused data allowed us to gather empirical findings as to what actually works for the students, in particularly underrepresented students, rather than administrators, instructors, or instructional support staff deciding on anecdotal, experience, or assumptions based on partial or inaccurate data. This sessions brings those cross-institutional findings in blended and online learning and ask the participants — what do we do next? It is round table brainstorming discussions that takes these finding from this large on distance education (blended, online, and competency-based education) and challenges the participants on determining how to interpret these findings, turn them into practice, and develop diffusion processes across the institution. Results alone are useless.
Lessons Learned and the Future of Online, Distance-Delivered, Graduate-Level STEM Content through the Science for Educators Specialization at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln
Arbor I
Presenters: Matthew Douglass (UNL), David Gosselin (UNL)
On a national scale, there is a demand for K-12 and extension educators prepared to meet the challenges of teaching STEM and ensuring access to high quality professional development opportunities. The interdisciplinary Science for Educators (S4E) specialization within the online Master of Applied Science program from the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska—Lincoln was created to address the challenges of improving teachers’ science content knowledge, model pedagogy that enhances learning and create relevant standards-based curricula. In this presentation, attendees will learn about the development and implementation of the innovative S4E program, from its pedagogical approach to online education to the lessons learned regarding teacher engagement, assessment activities and the future development of collaboration at the course and program levels. 
Active, Online & At Your Own Pace: Helping Students Become Informationally Literate
Arbor II
Presenters: Andrew J. Cano (UNL), Toni Anaya (UNL)
The University of Nebraska—Lincoln Libraries has developed a new virtual learning program aimed to partner with faculty to increase student information literacy skills. Through the program, self-paced online modules are designed to increase key information literacy skills critical to academic success and incorporate mastery level assessment for evaluation. The modules can be customized for specific classes and disciplines. A team from the Libraries will demonstrate how the tutorials work, explain how faculty can locate and incorporate them into classes using Canvas Commons and how the modules can be customized to meet specific or program needs.  Attendees will better understand how the Libraries have shifted from a collections-based mission to a service-based mission, especially in providing support for online learners.  
UNMC HoloLens Development
Garrat
Presenters: Greg Karst (UNMC), Ka-Chun Siu (UNMC), Michael Kozak (UNMC), Christina Jackson (UNMC)
In this session, we will discuss the capabilities of the HoloLense augmented reality (AR) device, differences between AR and virtual reality (VR) and the potential for integrating AR into health professions education. Examples of current and proposed educational uses of AR will be provided, along with guidelines for choosing between AR and VR platforms for a given educational purpose. We will also discuss facing the challenge of developing AR/VR content of the breadth and depth required for health professions education and dealing with the rapid development and proliferation of hardware platforms for such purposes. 
OneIT Overview
Hawthorne
Presenters: Mark Askren (UNCA), Bret Blackman (UNO), Yvette Holly (UNMC), Deb Schroeder (UNK) 
OneIT is a reimagining of how Information Technology is delivered across campuses at the University of Nebraska. OneIT can deliver a number of core IT services to the entire university more efficiently, more cost-effectively and can scale to meet rising demand. OneIT is also about leading organizational change to maximize service and manage talent and resources in an uncertain economic environment to not only survive, but thrive. The campus CIOs will lead a discussion on the overall vision as well as the review the road map ahead. 
From Blackboard to Canvas: Tips for the Transition
Lancaster IV
Presenter: Michelle Homp
Learn tips and tricks to make the transition from Blackboard to Canvas a more seamless process. Over the past academic year, the UNL Department of Mathematics online master’s degree program converted platforms. The multitude of resources and support available, along with its user-friendly interface, make the technical aspects of using Canvas relatively simple to learn. However, the presentation of courses in Canvas and the organizational structure are very different in Blackboard. Attendees will gain practical suggestions for mimicking features of Blackboard’s organizational structure which are desirable, while capitalizing on the strengths of the Canvas platform. This presentation is intended for course instructors who are relatively new to Canvas. 
Building Effective Online Education Video Lectures: Recommendations from Research and Practice
Lancaster V-VI
Presenter: Paul J.A. van Vliet
As universities continue to increase their online course offerings, faculty developing online course content may find that in-class practices do not always transfer effectively to the online environment. This presentation focuses on how instructors can better design and develop video lectures to improve student learning outcomes. Attendees learn how incorporating multimedia principles and lessons from practices have shown that video lecture development requires consideration of length, structure, interactivity, accessibility, and personalization.
Using Data Strategically
Olive Branch
Presenters: Hank Robinson (UNO), Heath Tuttle (UNL), Kristin Yates (UNCA)
The national conversation about the cost and value of higher education highlight the need for the strategic use of knowledge gained from institutional data. At the University of Nebraska, collaboration between our research and institutional effectiveness groups has provided opportunities to use data to address tough issues. Each speaker will share successes and challenges, in the hopes of improving the opportunities for success for everyone. 
Transforming Learning of Carcass Anatomy through Virtual Reality and Visualization
Yankee Hill I
Presenters: Ashu Green (UNL), Steven Jones (UNL), Dennis Burson (UNL)
Many traditional learning environments utilize monolithic methods for teaching anatomy that fail to engage students or pedagogically enhance their cognitive development to the fullest potential. In this presentation, we take a look at Virtual Reality (VR) and Visualization as successful learning tools in student engagement. In particular, we look at how 3D technologies result in a cost-savings through the ability to reach larger audiences of learners anytime, anyplace and anywhere in the study of carcass anatomy in meat science. It is expected that this project will result in creating a comprehensive, technology-rich and engaging learning environment that is available over the Internet and enables learners to understand the complex structures and concepts. Our findings could be widely applicable across disciplines. 

11:10 – 12:00 PM

Session II

Featured Extended Session: Creating & Diffusing Online Instruction & Institutional Practices From Data & Evidence
Lancaster I-II-III
Featured Guest Presenter: Tanya Joosten
The session is formatted as round table brainstorming discussions that takes findings from a cross-institutional study (10+ institutions) on digital education and challenges the participants on determining how to interpret these findings, turn them into practice, and develop diffusion processes across the institution. We often hear people discuss data-driven decisions or evidence-based practices, yet many times the data and evidence that is driving our decisions and our practices within our educational institutions lacks the rigor of empirical research. The DETA Research Center spent two years designing research models and conducting rigorous research in higher ed across a dozen institutions (2-year and 4-year) to help us identify effective instructional and institutional practices in blended and online courses and programs. The research models including guides to research, survey instrumentation packet, data codebooks, shared definitions, and operationalizations of variables were shared in the DETA Research Toolkit. The data from student surveys and institutionally warehoused data allowed us to gather empirical findings as to what actually works for the students, in particularly underrepresented students, rather than administrators, instructors, or instructional support staff deciding on anecdotal, experience, or assumptions based on partial or inaccurate data. This sessions brings those cross-institutional findings in blended and online learning and ask the participants — what do we do next? It is round table brainstorming discussions that takes these finding from this large on distance education (blended, online, and competency-based education) and challenges the participants on determining how to interpret these findings, turn them into practice, and develop diffusion processes across the institution. Results alone are useless.
Women in IT Update
Arbor I
Presenters: Marcia L Dority Baker (UNL), Amy Metzger (UNCA)
It’s been six months since the 2016 IT Leadership Conference—“Opportunity that Scales: Women Advancing the Future of Information Technology in Higher Education.” This exciting one-and-a-half-day conference focused on issues that women in IT face with advancement opportunities, organizational struggles with retaining women and the recruiting of a diverse workforce in higher education IT. This session includes a discussion on changes in our organizations, companies, campuses or spheres of influence since the conference. Attendees will review the take-away’s from the conference, discuss action items and highlight opportunities to make change. Plans for the 2017 fall conference will also be discussed. 
Leading from Where You Are in Times of Change
Arbor II
Presenter: Lori Green, Leadership Coach and Facilitator, MOR Associates
Change is on the horizon. Attendees will explore change; what it means to you, how to frame it and what you can do to step up and be part of the evolution. 
Sifting Through the Noise to Focus on What Makes a Difference in Successful Online Student Recruitment
Garrat
Presenters: Erica Rose (UNO), Laura Wiese (UNCA), Suzanne Withem (UNO)
Often, online programs operate with limited staff wearing multiple hats with shoestring budgets. It can be difficult to know what to focus on when the scope of these demands is so daunting. This session focuses on best practices in online program marketing, recruitment and management of prospective student inquiries to enrollment. Two UNO programs are offered as case studies with strategies and processes designed to work smart and leverage limited resources. Special focus will be made on how each program took a data-driven, systematic approach to focusing their efforts for maximum impact. A general framework for enrollment management will be shared as well as some best practices in online program marketing and recruitment.
What's Ahead for Multi-Factor Authentication at the University of Nebraska? 
Hawthorne
Presenters: Andrea Childress (UNK), Rick Haugerud (UNCA), Matt Morton (UNO)

Multi-factor authentication platforms continue to provide leading edge protection for critical business applications and end-user credentials. Learn where the University of Nebraska will be deploying multi-factor authentication next and when to expect it. 

OER-Based Learning Materials for Online Graduate Courses: Preliminary Evaluation of Four Years Implementation
Lancaster IV
Presenters: Phu Vu (UNK), Scott Fredrickson (UNK)
Open Educational Resources (OER) are one of the leading educational trends in higher education because of the opportunity to fuel collaboration, encourage the improvement of available materials and aid in the dissemination of best practices. In addition, OERs can help cut cost for both the institutions and learners. This presentation aims to share the preliminary findings of online learners’ perceptions on the instructor’s adoption of OER-based learning materials in online graduate courses and OER adoption strategies of the instructor to facilitate the teaching and learning process. Strategies and tips for how OERs were adopted in online graduate courses will be shared. 
Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality: Making it Work for Teaching and Learning
Lancaster V-VI
Presenters: Suhasini Kotcherlakota (UNMC), Patrick Rejda (UNMC), Michael Kozak (UNMC) 
Do you plan to use AR/VR in your teaching but are confused or struggling to choose techniques that are practical and affordable to use? This presentation focuses on the integration of AR/VR technologies for teaching and creating newer forms of learning experiences for your students. We will discuss AR/VR resources, advantages and challenges; and identify theoretical frameworks/ learning outcomes relevant to your objectives. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will take away at least 3-5 curated examples and a clear understanding of pedagogical methods and type of AR/VR technologies to use in their teaching and learning. Portions of the presentation may include interaction and participants are encouraged to bring a mobile device.
Engaging in Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in an Online Course: Higher Education Doctoral Students' Scholarly Development
Olive Branch
Presenters: Christina Yao (UNL), Crystal E. Garcia (UNL)
It is imperative that students explore their learning process during the critical first semester, particularly in a virtual community. In this presentation, we model the use of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning to explore higher education doctoral students’ perceptions of their socialization, development and preparation in an online foundations course. The course was intended to assist new students with developing their scholarly identity while gaining knowledge of the skills and habits necessary for navigating their doctoral program. Attendees will learn how we were able to gain a better understanding of our roles as instructor and graduate course assistant through the use of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in co-creating learning for student success.

12:00 – 1:00 PM

Lunch

Grand Ballroom

1:00 – 1:30 PM

Exhibit Hall Highlight and Dessert Break

Atrium

1:30 – 2:20 PM

Session III

Featured Extended Session: Teaching in Blended and Online Learning Environments: Creating & Sustaining Communities of Inquiry 
Lancaster I-II-III
Keynote Speaker: Norman Vaughan (Mount Royal University)
The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with a “hands-on” opportunity to learn how to apply the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework and related principles to the design, facilitation and direction of a blended or online course experience. During this workshop participants will: (1) Design and organize a blended or online course or module using the CoI framework, (2) Co-construct facilitation and moderation guidelines for a course or module, (3) develop direction and leadership strategies for a course or module.
Best Practices of Diverse Online Learning Environments
Arbor I
Presenter: Peggy Jones (UNO)
The UNO Women’s and Gender Studies program is currently offering an undergraduate online certificate in Gender and Leadership. Information will be shared on how the process occurred from initial thought to certificate being offered, including a variety of experiences, from discerning a need, setting up a working group, gathering data, collaborating with colleagues in and out of the program, writing and revising the proposal, the experience of testifying before the Coordinating Commission of Post-Secondary Education, to marketing the new online offering via a range of delivery methods. This session would assist those wanting to develop curriculum where online delivery is key both philosophically and pedagogically.
Box for Research and Other Sensitive Data
Arbor II
Presenters: Corrie Svehla (UNL), Cheryl O'Dell (UNL)
Recently, the University of Nebraska purchased an agreement with BOX, known as the Business Associate’s Agreement (BAA), to allow the storage of HIPAA data. With this agreement in place, this means research data can be securely and legally stored in BOX. From the start of the project, the team was asked to see if BOX could be the solution for other types of sensitive data storage. Attendees will learn how the members of the ITS teams across the campuses have developed and implemented this storage option. Bring your questions and hear how the team set up the solution, how the project was established and implemented and some of the concerns that came up during the project. 
To Speak or Not to Speak: Considerations and Best Practices for Teaching Effective Speaking Online 
Garrat
Presenter: Marlina Davidson (UNO)
How can you incorporate public speaking into your online courses? This session offers best practices and considerations for incorporating public speaking into your courses. The principles covered in this session will include: a “snapshot” into online public speaking courses, current approaches to online public speaking, best practices for teaching public speaking online, questions that faculty and course designers might want to consider, steps to implement virtual presentations and sample rubrics and presentation assignments.
OneIT Overview
Hawthorne
Presenters: Mark Askren (UNCA), Bret Blackman (UNO), Yvette Holly (UNMC), Deb Schroeder (UNK)
OneIT is a reimagining of how Information Technology is delivered across campuses at the University of Nebraska. OneIT can deliver a number of core IT services to the entire university more efficiently, more cost-effectively and can scale to meet rising demand. OneIT is also about leading organizational change to maximize service and manage talent and resources in an uncertain economic environment to not only survive, but thrive. The campus CIOs will lead a discussion on the overall vision as well as the review the roadmap ahead. 
Case Study-Based E-Learning Modules in Medical Education: A Delicate Balance of Innovation, Time and Educational Outcomes
Lancaster IV
Presenters: Tanya Custer (UNMC), Kim Michael (UNMC)
In the higher education realm, faculty are charged with using or developing innovative and interactive educational tools to teach “old” material in new way. As current participants in this educational evolution, it quickly becomes apparent that many outside factors affect and impact this change. Computer software, faculty time, IT challenges, and diverse learners must all be considered when designing a new teaching technology. This presentation will focus on each of those topics related to the development of case study-based E-Learning modules in the health professions curriculum. Presenters will then focus on discussing challenges, best practices and student feedback in regard to their experiences in integrating the modules into the curriculum. Participants will want to bring their own device to participate.

The 3-Minute Lecture: Integrating Microlectures to Foster Student Learning, Satisfaction and Engagement
Lancaster V-VI
Presenters: B.Jean Mandernach (UNK), Guy Trainin (UNL)
The impersonal, text-heavy nature of many online classrooms makes it challenging for instructors to engage students with course material in an interesting, meaningful way. Microlectures provide an effective way for online instructors to personalize the learning experience and promote students’ active engagement with course material. Equally important, microlectures are an efficient instructional strategy that require minimal technological expertise or specialized equipment. In this presentation, instructors will learn how to create and integrate microlectures into the online classroom and enhance student learning, engagement and satisfaction. 
Are Your Servers Secure? 
Olive Branch
Presenters: Rick Haugerud (UNCA), Matt Morton (UNO), Sharon Welna (UNMC)

Patch management is an important part of any security program. Keeping your operating systems and applications up to date and on the most current available releases is the fundamental requirement in protecting your data. Learn how ITS can help you identify and remediate vulnerable systems in your environment.

Understanding Copyright and Fair Use in an Open-Access Academic Setting
Yankee Hill I
Presenter: Laura Gonnerman (UNCA)

This presentation covers a diverse selection of issues specific to copyright law, with an emphasis on copyright in an open-access academic setting. Topics will include a brief overview of copyright law, an explanation of copyright protections, the TEACH Act, fair use exemptions and licensing. 

2:30 – 3:20 PM

Session IV

Featured Extended Session: Teaching in Blended and Online Learning Environments: Creating & Sustaining Communities of Inquiry
Lancaster I-II-III
Keynote Speaker: Norman Vaughan (Mount Royal University)
The purpose of this workshop is to provide participants with a “hands-on” opportunity to learn how to apply the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework and related principles to the design, facilitation and direction of a blended or online course experience. During this workshop participants will: (1) Design and organize a blended or online course or module using the CoI framework, (2) Co-construct facilitation and moderation guidelines for a course or module, (3) develop direction and leadership strategies for a course or module.
Universal Design for Learning in the Online Classroom Space
Arbor I
Presenters: Anne Karabon (UNO), Melissa Cast-Brede (UNO), Jessica Hagaman (UNO)
This session shows how to apply the principles of universal design for learning (UDL) in higher education courses primarily conducted online. A proactive approach, UDL focuses on the development of contingency plans for students needing accommodation. The presenters will describe ways to develop classroom goals, connections with students, organization of materials and methods of delivery that use UDL to meet the needs of all learners. Particular attention will be given to how UDL can inform online class design and how to incorporate features of Learning Management Systems to make an online space inclusive for all. Attendees will gain more knowledge about UDL and actionable ways to enrich their practice and approach to learning online.
Transforming IT Procurement for NU
Arbor II
Presenters: Amy Metzger (UNCA), Maggie Witt (UNL)
Attendees will learn strategies for transforming sourcing and procurement of IT products and services across NU to realize savings and generate value, while maximizing efficiencies and improving service levels. 
The Unizin Value Proposition
Garrat 
Presenters: Lance Perez (UNL), Heath Tuttle (UNL)
The Unizin consortium is a group of like-minded tier one universities who are all working to make education and educational technology more accessible, more affordable and more effective. Presenters will provide insight into how UNL is working with the other members of the consortium to meet the educational and pedagogical needs of students, staff and faculty. The three key elements of the Unizin ecosystem are a learning management system (Canvas), a digital materials repository and digital textbook platform and learning analytics platform. You will learn about UNL and Unizin’s progress to date and how UNL students, faculty and staff are benefiting from the Unizin membership. 
Canvas Migration Update
Hawthorne
Presenters: Jaci Lindburg (UNO), Jeremy Van Hof (UNL), Dan Moser (UNMC), Jane Petersen (UNK)
The process of exploring, piloting and implementing a new Learning Management System (LMS) can be a major change for a university. Coordinating this type of effort across an entire university system is a substantial undertaking requiring solid leadership and communication. The presenters of this session will discuss how NU transitioned to Canvas, including the selection process, project management, integration with multiple stakeholders, gaining buy-in, identifying champions and creating an effective communication strategy. In addition, the presenters will outline Kotter’s (1996) Eight Stage Process to Leading Change and discuss the ways in which the Canvas project paralleled Kotter’s work. 
Teaching Gen Z: Flipping the Classroom to Increase Engagement of the New Multi-Modal Learners
Lancaster IV
Presenters: Katie Sewell (UNL), Paula Caldwell (UNL)
Participants in this session will learn about common attributes of Generation Z that change the way they learn when compared to traditional Millennials, specifically the attributes that should be taken into account when designing a course or program. Participants will learn about the flipped classroom model leveraged by the BSAD 222, discuss best practices and develop ideas for how they can begin to flip their own classes or programs to both increase engagement of Gen Z students and save time for staff and instructors. The information presented and discussed can be applied directly to traditional courses, online learning and student programming. 
Increasing Retention by Facilitating Instructor-Student Engagement in Large Online Sections
Lancaster V-VI
Manda Williamson (UNL), Eyde Olson (UNL)
The purpose of this presentation is to take a look at Introduction to Psychology, one of approximately 25 freshmen level courses found to impact overall university retention. If students do not achieve success in this online course, they face a higher likelihood of attrition. Attendees will learn basics of efficacy motivational theory, used to redesign the course, and many practical examples of its use that generalize to other courses: specifically, effect size will be presented depicting the utility of collaborative written assignments versus individual written assignments and overall perceptions of students who completed the revamped course. The results of the implementation were successful, as "DFW" rates dropped to less than 15%.
Collaborative and Evolutionary Course Design: Lessons Learned from a High Enrollment Writing Course
Olive Branch
Presenters: Amber Messersmith (UNL), Steven Cain (UNL), Laura Madeline Wiseman (UNL)
Ensuring a consistent student experience while challenging both novice and advanced students in a high-enrollment class was identified as the primary goal of the new Business Writing class. To keep everyone in the class improving, we leveraged peer review of writing to engage the students with one another's work. Maintaining a consistent experience meant coordinating a unified LMS presence, developing shared lesson plans and establishing clear grading expectations for all instructors. In this session, we will discuss the benefits and challenges encountered in implementing these strategies and share concrete suggestions based on the successes found in course revision. We are continuing to discover data-driven areas of improvement and developing plans to increase engagement.
Experiences Implementing an Emporium Style Teaching Model
Yankee Hill I
Presenters: Adam Wagler (UNL), Katie Krcmarki (UNL), Alan Eno (UNL)
As class sizes increase so does the need for physical space and additional faculty members. Combined with the increased need for consistency in instruction, all these issues can become hurdles that departments, faculty and instructional designers need to overcome. 
This presentation will share one approach implemented in the fall of 2016 to address these challenges. Participants will learn about UNL’s College of Journalism and Mass Communications implementation of an emporium style teaching model combined with challenge based learning strategies. The presentation also covers the process of implementing the program along with an in-depth exploration of planning, scope, process, challenges and instructional design strategies.

3:20 – 3:30 PM

Refreshment Break

Atrium

3:30 – 4:30 PM

Closing Panel Discussion

Grand Ballroom

4:30 – 4:45 PM

Closing Remarks

Grand Ballroom